Skip to main content

Full text of "Kinsey Seminary Catalog"

See other formats







KINSEY SEMINARY 

Wilson, N. C.==i896='97. 



j 

\ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/kinseyseminaryca18961897 




ANNOUNCEflENT 



OF 



Kin.sey Seminary, 



FOR 



F=^1897-'98-a=^i ' L ^O.K 



AND 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



FOR THE 



Year Ending June 4, 1897. 

LA GRANGE, N. C. 



NASH BROTHERS, 
BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS. 
GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



" IS? 







BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



Geo. Hackney, 
Joseph Kinsey, 
Geo. D. Green, 
Jonas Oettinger, 



President. 
1st Vice-President. 
2nd Vice-President. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



Col. J. F. Bruton, 
Hon. F. A. Woodard, 
Elder P. D. Gold, 
Haywood Edmundson, 
Judge H. G. Connor, 
Silas Lucas, 
Jonathan Applewhite 



EXECUTIVE COMfllTTEE. 



George Hackney, 
Geo. D. Green, 



Joseph Klnsey, 
Jonas Oettinger. 



ID 



KINSEY SEMINARY. 



THIS SEMINARY for young ladies was established 
in 1SS6 by the Principal, who brought to it an ex- 
perience dating from 1865. Such an institution was 
needed in Eastern North Carolina, and it met with pub- 
lic favor in the beginning. Its growth has been regu- 
lar and healthy. Its work is thorough, practical and of 
such character as to win public favor. Its management 
has been such that a growing reputation has marked 
its career. The improved methods of education and the 
demands of a progressive age are found in this school. 

Honest work is its policy. It can fulfill its promises 
and proposes in a quiet, earnest way to make of its 
pupils cultured, christian women. 

Efforts have been made and will continue to be used 
to have this Seminary stand second to none in splendid 
equipment and good management. It relies strictly on 
merit as it has no money endowment, no church backing. 

The continually increasing patronage, won by its ex- 
cellence, is a sure guarantee of its appreciation by the 
public. Its catalogue is published to give definite and 
reliable information. 

3 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



DURING the past year the business men and citizens 
of Wilson, realizing that the progress of a town 
is due in a great measure to the educational ad- 
vantages it can offer, coupled with push and tact, con- 
ceived the plan of erecting suitable brick buildings with 
all modern conveniences and invited the principal of 
Kinsey Seminary to move his school to their town. To 
meet the increasing demand on him for better advan- 
tages that the Seminary must offer to cope with other 
institutions he accepted their offer and the Fall Term of 
1897 will open in a two-story brick building, with electric 
lights, water, completely sewered and heated by steam. 
Expense will not be spared to make it equal if not supe- 
rior to any school building in the State. 

It will have a large chapel and art room, society halls, 
dining room and principal's residence all under the same 
roof and attached to the same building an auditorum 
that will seat 500. 

4 




COURSE OF STUDY. 



First Year. 



FALL TERM. 

Arithmetic, (Stoddard). 
Arithmetic, (Wentworth ). 
Algebra, (Sanford). 
English Grammar, (Harvey). 
Physiology, (Steele). 



SPRING TERM. 

Arithmetic, (Stoddard). 
Arithmetic, (Wentworth). 
Algebra, (Sanford). 
English Grammar, (Harvey). 
History. 



Second Year, 



Arithmetic, (Wentworth). 
Algebra, (Wentworth). 
Rhetoric, (Lockwood). 
Latin, (Collar & Daniel). 
English History, (Montgomery) 

Third Year. 



Review of Geography, (Frye) 
Algebra, ( Wentworth V 
Rhetoric, (Lockwood). 
Latin, (Collar & Daniel). 
Euglish History, (Montgomery). 



Algebra, (Wentworth). 
Geometry, (Wentworth). 
Physical Geography, (Houston). 
Latin (Csesar), or German. 
English Literature, (Shaw). 
L T . S. History, (Chambers). 



Botany, (Youman). 
Geometry, (Wentworth). 
Civil Government, (Finger). 
Latin (Sallust), or German. 
English Literature, (Shaw). 
U. S. History, (Chambers). 



Fourth Year. 



Geometry. (Wentworth). 
Amer. Literature, (B. Matthews) 
Latin (Virgil), or German. 
General History, (Meyer). 
Physics, (Gage). 



Trigonometry, (Wentworth). 
Amer. Literature, (B. Matthews). 
Latin Prose (Arnold), or German. 
General History, (Meyer). 
Review of Arithmetic. 



Preparatory. 

English Grammar, (Harvey), to Syntax. Arithmetic, (Wentworth), to 
Compound Quantities. Arithmetic, (Stoddard). Geography, (Frye). 
U. S. History. 

Additional Exercises. 

Spelling, Reading, Composition, Penmanship and Sight Singing. 

5 



COURSE IN READING. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Rime of the Ancient Mariner; Cotter's Saturday Night; Evangeline. 



SECOND YEAR. 



Goldsmith's Deserted Village, and The Traveller ; Roger de Coverly; 
Lady of the Lake. 



THIRD YEAR. 



Shakespeare's Plays — Julius C:esar, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, King 
Lear, As You Like It. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

American Prose and Poetry. 

This reading is done in class and a systematic study is made of each 
subject. The object is not to read a certain number of books but to create 
a taste for good literature. Other works are interspersed at the discretion 
of the teacher. 

6 




REMARKS ON COURSE OF STUDY. 



LONG experience has convinced us that it is a diffi- 
cult task to give each pupil the kind of work suited 
to her individual capacities and just enough of it 
so as not to interfere with the time needful for rest and 
physical culture. Educators agree that it is not the 
number of books that makes the scholar, but the char- 
acter of the work done. We advise students not to 
take more than four studies at one time, besides music 
and painting. Six or eight studies, taken in one ses- 
sion, generally result in a strain of the faculties beyond 
their normal capacity. "Young ladies often come out 
of school with shattered health and unfit for life and its 
pleasures. This is faulty school work. Education 
means no such thing. It means mental discipline and 
moral training. These are by no means incompatible 
with physical government and good health. 1 ' Our 
course of study has been carefully prepared and when 
completed fits a girl for admission into the best colleges, 
or prepares her for teaching. "Memorized facts do not 
make scholars, it is mental training, power of concen- 
tration and love for study. These we consider the 
essential qualifications for graduation, whether obtained 
by a long or short school connection. Our motto is 
thorough, rather than rapid, work. We prefer that 
our girls leave school patient and persevering in study, 
capable of independent thought rather than have their 
young minds crammed with facts.' 1 

7 



MUSIC COURSE. 



PIANO. 



Primary Class. — Peter's Copy Book; Kullak's Finger 
Exercises; Kohler's Practical Method, Op. 249; Scales; 
Kohler's Twelve Little Studies; Studies by Loeschorn. 

First Class. — Kullak's Finger Exercises; Duvernoy's 
Ecole de Mechanism books 1, 2 and 3; Kohler's Practical 
Method, Op. 249 books 2 and 3; Scales. 

Second Class. — Bertini's Studies, Op. 29 books 1 and 
2; Heller, Op. 45 books 1 and 2; Scales; Palmer's Primer; 
Czerny's Octave Studies. 

Third Class. — Schmitt-Faelten Preparatory Exer- 
cises; Berweni's School of Velocity, Op. 61; Turner's Oc- 
tave Studies; Bach's Little Preludes and Fugues; Cramer- 
Von Bulow Etudes; History of Music. 

Fourth Class. — Czerny, Op. 740; Turner's Octaves, 
Op. 28; Bach's Two and Three Part Inventions; Scales, 
Arpeggios; History of Music. 

In connection with the above, Kuklau's, dementi's, 
Dussek's, Haydn's, Mozart's, and Beethoven's Sonatas 
and other compositions, both classical and modern, are 
given throughout the course. 

S 




VOCAL DEPARTMENT. 



Believing that the singing voice is a sacred gift to be 
held in trust for the happiness of others, we have en- 
deavored to place within the reach of our pupils the 
very best instruction from a teacher of experience and 
considerable training. To this end a two year's course 
in voice cultivation has been arranged. Purity of tone 
and clear enunciation are the features of most impor- 
tance and will be given close attention. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Natural tone production, independence of jaw and 
tongue; relaxation of throat muscles; breathing exer- 
cises; scale practice; English songs for distinct articu- 
lation. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Tone production and breathing exercises (continued); 
six week's course in Italian; exercises from Nava, Con- 
cone Seiber, Panofka Marchesi, and Bordogni for culti- 
vating flexibility of voice, Italian and German songs; 
Part songs. 



COURSE IN ART DEPARTMENT. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Linear Perspective. 

Shades and Shadows. 

Drawing from Casts. 

Pen and Ink Drawing. 

Charcoal Drawings. 

Crayon work, or Pastel Studies. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Drawing from Casts. 

Oil paintings (still life), or Water Colors. 

Crayon work and pastel studies. 

Time sketches in black and white and color. 

Art History. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Oil Painting, or Water Colors. 

Art History. 

Perspective. 

Time sketches. 

Pastel or Crayon. 

Cast Drawing. 

10 




RATES FOR YEAR. 



Board and Tuition 8150.00. 

Above covers Tuition in Latin and German. 

Pupils desiring to take Instrumental Music, Drawing 

and Painting, and Special Yocal Lessons, will be charged 

extra at following rates: 

Instrumental Music §30.00 

Drawing 30. 00 

Painting 30. 00 

Vocal Lessons 30.00 

Tuition for resident pupils 30 .00 

Use of piano, one hour each day, per year. . 5.00 

More than two extras with literary work should not 
be taken. 

Charges begin from date of entrance. Deductions 
made in cases of protracted illness. An advance pay- 
ment for one fourth of year's expense must be made, 
or satisfactory reference given if indulgence should be 
desired. 

PAYMENTS, WHEX MADE. 

When statements are received, make no delay in 
remitting. 

11 




GENERAL INFORMATION. 



LOCATION. 

Wilson is in Wilson County, N. C, on the Coast Line 
and Southern Railroads, 108 miles from Wilmington, 
55 from Raleigh, 141 from Richmond and 140 from Nor- 
folk. It is of easy access by rail and telegraph from 
almost all parts of the country. Location is healthy and 
climate pure. Dr. Albert Anderson in his report to the 
Superintendent of Health, Dr. Nathan Anderson, April 
27, 1896, says: ' k In making a quantitative bacteriolo- 
gical analysis of the sample of water collected by you 
on 25th inst., I find only 154 bacteria to the cubic 
centimetre. This with other tests shows that the water 
from the city water system is good." 

CHARACTER OF SCHOOL. 

The Kinsey Seminary is a female boarding school. 
As the object in teaching is thoroughness the greatest 
care is used in selecting teachers; none but competent 
ones are employed. We give girls a thorough prepara- 
tion for the higher classes of colleges, or fit them for 
successful work as teachers. 

The Kinsey Seminary is the only Female Boarding 
School in Eastern North Carolina in which girls are re- 
quired to wear the prescribed uniform of the school. 

The School is strictly non-sectarian. Our patrons are 
representatives of almost all the religious denominations, 
and our teachers are selected on the ground of compe- 
tency regardless of church relations. 

12 



Kinsey Seminary. 13 



DESIGN OF THE SCHOOL. 

It is the design of the Principal to meet a recognized 
want in some places, and one fast gaining ground in 
others, of a school in which young ladies are taught 
subjects, not books. It will be his constant aim to teach 
them in such a way that when they leave the Kinsey 
Seminary, they will know some things well. If they 
desire to attend college, they will be prepared when 
they go to enter college classes. It is intended to em- 
ploy and retain only those teachers who know the differ- 
ence between theory and practice, teaching and hearing 
a recitation. 

ADVANTAGES. 

Parents cau not over-estimate the advantage of board- 
ing pupils in the School. They receive constant atten- 
tion, are not interrupted in their work, are under re- 
straint of regulations conducive to good habits, and 
receive instruction in many things not offered to day 
pupils. Their improvement in mind and manners is so 
much greater that the Principal reserves the right to 
refuse to receive those from a distance as day scholars 
whose reasons for boarding in town are not satisfactory 
to him. 

UNIFOR/T. 

We have found the plan of uniforming the girls per- 
fectly satisfactory to the students and patrons, and it 
has elicited the admiration of the public. It obviates the 
difficulty of invidious distinction in dress, it saves ex- 
pense, it saves time, it saves thought and reserves it for 
other and higher uses. 



¥ 




14 Kinsey Seminary. 



In preparing a young lady's wardrobe for Kinsey 
Seminary, it will not be necessary to furnish an extra 
dress to be worn on special occasions. The uniform 
supplies this need and is worn whenever the pupil 
leaves the school for church or in any school capacity, 
except a few weeks at the beginning in September and 
a few weeks at the close in May. In leaving home all 
that will be needed in the way of wearing apparel, will 
be a supply of good, neat clothing for every day use in 
the school- rooms, rubber shoes, gossamer, umbrella. 
The uniform will be made in Wilson. On entering 
school each boarder must have measure taken and de- 
posit $10.00 for dress and hat. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline is parental but firm. We employ none 
but female teachers, who by the advice of the Principal 
and Lady Principal, maintain authority and enforce all 
needful requirements. In the management of obstinate 
pupils appeals are made to their reason, their affection 
and lady-like sense of* propriety. Boarders are consid- 
ered members of the family, treated as ladies and are 
expected to act as such. Pupils committed to our care 
will be watched over and attended in health or in sick- 
ness, in school or out of school, with the same careful 
solicitude bestowed upon our own daughters. We use 
discipline as a means to an end. Our rules are few and 
simple such as experience has shown necessary to make 
instruction thorough and develop the mind and charac- 
ter of our pupils. 






Kinsey Seminary. 15 



ADMISSION OF PUPILS. 

Pupils will be received at any time during the session 
and will be charged at regular specified rates from date 
of entrance. It is very essential to the progress of 
pupils that they be present promptly on the day of open- 
ing. No one will be received for a shorter period than 
the entire year, or the remaining portion thereof at 
the time of entrance. Precaution will be used to pre- 
vent the admission of any one whose example and influ- 
ence might prove injurious to others. No pupil who is 
found to exert an evil influence in the school who de- 
rives no benefit herself and whose example is injurious, 
will be retained. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

In this department girls and young ladies not prepared 
to enter the Academic Department will receive thor- 
ough instruction in all branches intended to fit them for 
admission into higher classes. 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. 

The course of study in this department embraces 
English, Mathematics, Latin and German. Instruction 
in all branches is thorough. 

ART DEPARTHENT. 

This department of the Seminary now compares fa- 
vorably with such departments in other schools of the 
State. The flattering notices of our exhibits at the 
State and New Berne Fairs from the press and prem- 



iums awarded mean something. The object of this 
course is two-fold: first, the education of the mind, the 
eye and the hand; second, the painting of pictures and 
crayoning of portraits, enabling a young lady to employ 
her time profitably and pleasantly. Art is an accom- 
plishment necessary to a finished education. We invite 
the attention of parents and guardians to this depart- 
ment of our Seminary. In it, the methods recognized 
as best and taught in the best schools will be used. 
Drawing from casts and nature in pencil, charcoal and 
crayon, and painting in oil and water colors will be 
taught as well as the principles of perspective. Our 
studio is furnished with a collection of casts and busts 
which art students use free of charge. 

PENHANSHIP. 

In order that every pupil who attends the Kinsey 
Seminary may be able to write a good hand, a certain 
part of each day is devoted to practice in writing under 
the supervision of a good teacher. In this department 
the student is drilled on the principles and movements 
which lay the foundation for neat, legible and rapid 
writing. Young ladies who can write a beautiful busi- 
ness hand, are wanted in the business departments of 
trade, at the present day. 

STUDY AND RECITATIONS. 

When not on recitation during school hours, girls do 
not study in their rooms but in the chapel under the 
supervision of a teacher. At night, they are required 
to spend two hours in preparing their lesson, for next 



Kinsey Seminary. 1 i 



day, which they do in the chapel, one of the teachers 
being present to render assistance and keep order. 

RELIGIOUS PRIVILEGES. 

A portion of the sacred scriptures is read before the 
whole school every morning accompanied with singing 
and appropriate devotion. The school also enjoys the 
opportunity of attending religious exercises of the differ- 
ent denominations every Sunday. Whenever the girls 
attend services they are accompanied by a teacher. 

BUILDINGS. 

Our new school building, a two-story brick structure, 
will have no superior in the State and possibly no equal. 
It will be modern in every respect, heated by steam, 
lighted by electricity and completely sewered. It will 
front 126 feet on Whitehead Avenue and 121 feet on 
Lee Street, and has a tower To feet high. This building- 
will surmount a slight hill and will be very convenient 
from the resident portion of the city. 

WHAT GIRLS FURNISH. 

Each pupil should bring from home the following: 
one pair blankets or comforts, one pair sheets, one bed- 
spread, one pillow and two pillow-cases, towels and 
napkins, comb and brush. 

All clothing, sheets, pillow-cases, towels and napkins 
should be plainly marked with full name of pupil. We 
will not be responsible for clothing not thus marked. 



18 Kinsey Seminary. 

ENTRANCE AND DEDUCTION. 

Prompt entrance at beginning of session is earnestly 
desired. The delay of a few weeks causes embarrass- 
ment to a pupil entering a class somewhat advanced. 
No deduction is made after the pupil is entered except 
at the option of the Principal. Those who leave school 
before the close of the term will be charged for board 
and tuition for whole session unless the pupil is com- 
pelled to leave on account of sickness. 

EXAMINATION. 

These are made at end of each quarter and are both 
written and oral. They are compulsory as to whole 
class and are as important as the recitations in deter- 
mining a pupil's standing in her studies. The result of 
these examinations will be kept on our record book for 
reference and examination by parents and guardians. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Two Literary Societies, conducted by the young 
ladies of the Seminary, aid very materially in develop- 
ing the mental faculties of the student, and help to 
make her self-reliant and confident. 

The exercises of these Societies consist of Elocutionary 
Recitals, Select Readings, Epistolary Correspondence, 
Essays, Original Poetry, and Criticism, interspersed 
with Instrumental and Vocal Music. 

VISITING AND CORRESPONDENCE, 

As absence from school interferes with the welfare 
and progress of the pupils, the visiting of homes or 
friends under ordinary circumstances cannot be allowed. 



In granting leave of absence, the Principal will be gov- 
erned by general rules impartially applied to all. It is 
not our desire to exclude young ladies from all social 
intercourse, but experience has taught us that they can 
not go into general society and attend to their studies at 
the same time. Visitors coming from the homes of the 
pupils and wishing to call on them must present letters 
of introduction from parents or guardians. Parents 
committing their daughters to our charge are respect- 
fully asked to consider this and also the following: 

Young ladies, while boarding in the school, will not 
be allowed to attend places of amusement, except in 
charge of teachers, or to spend the night out of the 
school . No permission, written or otherwise, can annul 
this regulation, and parents are particularly requested 
not to embarrass us by sending such permission. 

Correspondence with the home circle is freely en- 
couraged, but not beyond this. 

SPECIAL INFORMATION. 

A deposit for books and stationery must be made 
when pupils enter as the Principal cannot advance 
money for them. 

All communications for the Principal must be direct, 
and not by messages through the pupils. 

Pupils are required to retire by 10 p. m., at which 
time lights are extinguished. They are also required to 
put their beds in order at an early hour, after which 
servants enter the rooms and do all necessary cleaning. 
Daily inspection of the private rooms is made and the 
occupants are expected to keep them at all times neat. 
Violation of this regulation subjects the offender to de- 



20 Kinsey Seminary. 

merits. Calls made by friends or relatives must be an- 
nounced to the Principal, or Lady Principal and formal 
permission is required before the call can be received. 
In no case will pupils be allowed to receive visitors in 
their private rooms without permission. Borrowing of 
text books, money, clothing, jewelry and other articles 
is positively forbidden. Unnecessary expenditure of 
money will not be countenanced. Purchasing on credit 
is forbidden. Punctuality is required. Parents are 
particularly requested not to send boxes of cooked vic- 
tuals to their daughters. 

DIRECTIONS FOR REfllTTINQ. 

Send money by Draft, Check, Registered Letter or 
Post Office Order. Post office orders should be made 
payable to Joseph Kinsey, Principal. 

COMMUNICATIONS. 

Letters for^pupils should be addressed as follows: 

Miss , 

Kinsey Seminary, 

Wilson, N. C. 

Business communications should be addressed thus: 
JOSEPH KINSEY, 

Principal Kinsey Seminary, 

Wilson, N. C. 




ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

— FOR — 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 4, 1897. 



FACULTY. 

JOSEPH KINSEY, - Principal. 



MISS ALICE HINES, Chapel Manager, 
Mathematics and Latin. 



MISS MARY W. MILAM, 
Sciences, English, History and Trigonometry. 



MISS EVA KINSEY, 
Elocution, English, German and Mathematics. 



MISS M. B. SWAN, 
Vocal Music and Elocution. 



MISS ALICE CROOM, 
Piano. 



MISS INA KINSEY, 
Art Teacher. 

21 



PUPILS FOR 1896=='97. 



BOARDERS. 
B 

Evelyn Bowden Craven County. 

C 

Eva Croom Duplin County. 

Ethel B. Chesson Washington County, 

Abbie Carr Greene County. 

Minnie Casey Wayne County. 

F 

Lillian Fields Lenoir County. 

Ada Fields Pitt County. 

Q 

Daisy Gray Lenoir County. 

Clyde Gardner Pitt County. 

Alice Grimes Martin County. 

Helen Gray Lenoir County. 

H 

Gertrude Harper Harnett County. 

Anna L. Howard Lenoir County. 

Lillie P. Hodges Lenoir County. 

Carrie Hardison Craven County. 

I 

Efpie Isler Jones County. 

Lula Ives Craven County. 

K 

Theo. Kinsey Jones County. 

Maude G. Koonce Perquimans County. 

Kate Kinsey Craven County. 

Susie Keel Pitt County. 

Kate Kilpatrick Craven County. 

9,9, 



Kinsey Seminary. 23 



L 

Annie Lane Craven County. 

Sallie Loftin Duplin County. 

Maggie Lane Wayne County. 

M 

Mary A. Moye Pitt County. 

Julia May Wayne County. 

Zona May Wayne County. 

R 

Pearle Roberts Craven County. 

Nena Russell Jacksonville, Florida. 

Mabel Rasberry Halifax County. 

S 

Phebe Sutton Lenoir County. 

Maye Stevenson Lenoir County. 

Kate Sugg Greene County. 

Nina Sugg Greene County. 

Sadie Sutton Lenoir County. 

T 

Susie Taylor Lenoir County. 

Bessie Taylor Greene County. 

Dlara Thornton Cumberland County. 

Garnet Thornton Cumberland County. 

Mattie Thomas Lenoir County. 

Vicey Tucker Pitt County. 

w 

Eva Ward Onslow County. 

Lottie Wood Lenoir County. 




24 



Kinsey Seminary. 



RESIDENT PUPILS. 



Jennie Evans, 
Lillian Fields, 
Lela V. Fields, 
Attie Fields, 
Mamie Fields, 
Mattie Fields, 
Estelle Hardee, 
Adair Hardee, 
Robin Kinsey, 
Beatrice Kennedy, 
Mable Kennedy, 
Bessie Kennedy, 
Sophia Mewborne, 



Mable Murchison, 
Belle Murchison, 
Lora Peel, 
Daisy Peel, 
Eula Rouse, 
Rella Rose, 
Georgie Taylor, 
Nancy Taylor, 
Ada Taylor, 
Daisy Wooten, 
Ada Wooten. 
Eliza Wooten. 



s~&>°$-^ 




-fe 



MUSIC CLASS. 



PIANO. 



Evelyn Bowdex, 
Eva Croom, 
Ethel B. Chessox, 
Abbie Carr, 
Mamie Fields, 
Lela V. Fields, 
Attie Fields, 
Ada Fields, 
Daisy Gray, 
Clyde Gardxer, 
Alice Grimes, 
Gertrude Harper, 
Axxie Howard, 
Estelle Hardee, 
Carrie Hardis' >x, 
Effie Isler, 
Theo Kixsey, 
Ma ltd Koonce, 
Kate Kixsey, 
Robix Kixsey, 
Susie Keel, 

Eyelyx Bowdex, 
Eva Croovt, 
Abbie Carr, 
Mamie Fields, 
Helen Gray, 
Gertrude Harper, 
Anna Howard, 
Estelle Hard re, 
Effie Isler, 
Theo Kixsey, 



Beatrice Kexxedy, 
Mable Kexxedy, 
Bessie Kexxedy, 
Maggie Laxe, 
Mary A. Move, 
Belle Murchtsox, 
Rella Rose, 
Neva Russell, 
Mable Rasberry, 
Kate Sugg, 
Sadie Sutton, 
Bessie Taylor, 
Georgie Taylor, 
Nancy Taylor, 
Ada Taylor, 
Clara Thorxtox, 
Garxet Thornton, 
Ada Wootex, 
Eliza Wootex, 
Lottie Wood. 



VOCAL CLASS. 



Maude Koonce, 
Beatrice Kennedy, 
Mary Move, 
Eula ROUSE, 

Nena Russell. 
Mable Rasberry, 
Bessie Taylor, 
Georgie Taylor, 
Daisy Wootex, 
Eliza Wootex. 



ART CLASS. 



DRAWING. 



Eva Groom, 

Ada Fields, 
Helen Gray. 
Anna L Howard, 
Carrie Hardison, 
Effie Isler, 
Kate Kinsey, 
Robin Kinsey, 



Dora May, 
Mabel Murchison, 

Phebe Sutton, 
Clara Thornton, 
Garnet Thornton, 
Eliza Wooten, 
Eva Ward, 
Lottie Wood. 



Eva Groom, 
Mabel Murchison. 



PAINTING. 



Eliza Wooten. 



PASTELLE. 



Eva Croom, 
Helen Gray, 
Anna Howard, 



Effie Isler, 
Phebe Sutton, 
Eva Ward. 



26 



GRADUATES OF 1S96=='97. 



LITERARY COURSE. 

Axxa Howard. Lizzie Hadley. 



MUSIC COURSE. 



Ada Fields, 
Axxa Howard, 
Estelle Hardee. 



Maud G. Kooxce, 
Mary A. Moye, 



-li